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Ephemera Events & Exhibitions

Ephemera Society Winter Fair

Winter fair

Sunday 3 December 2017

Take a break from Christmas shopping when you're in the great metropolis this December. Drop by fashionable Bloomsbury where you will discover the genteel and lovable art of collecting printed and handwritten ephemera. Divorced from the distractions of the world you will find rare, unusual and historic paper items, priced from £2 to over £2000.

The fair offers a window into the past for both the curious and the collector amongst us. Rest your gaze upon the dealers’ tables which groan under the weight of accumulated history, the collecting of which heartens and sustains brave men and women.

All are welcome to what promises to be a memorable and enjoyable day - all this for just three little pound coins! Isn't civilisation wonderful?

  • Holiday Inn London Bloomsbury
  • Coram Street
  • London WC1N 1HT
  • United Kingdom
  • Entry £3 · 11am - 4pm
  • Members from 10am with membership cards
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Enquiries:

 

Ephemera Society Fairs 2018

Make A Note In Your Diary For Next Year

2018 fair dates

Sundays · 20 May · 2 December 2018

  • Holiday Inn London Bloomsbury
  • Coram Street
  • London WC1N 1HT
  • United Kingdom
  • Entry £3 · 11am - 4pm
  • Members from 10am with membership cards
  •  

Enquiries:

 

Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?

Image of poster

Until 14 January 2018

Explore the relationship between graphic design and health in this exhibition from the Wellcome Collection.

Comprising over 200 objects including hard-hitting posters, illuminated pharmacy signs and digital teaching aids, Can Graphic Design Save Your Life? considers the role of graphic design in constructing and communicating healthcare messages around the world, and shows how graphic design has been used to persuade, to inform and to empower.

This exhibition highlights the widespread and often subliminal nature of graphic design in shaping our environment, our health and our sense of self. Drawn from public and private collections around the world, it will feature work from influential figures in graphic design from the 20th century, as well as from studios and individual designers working today.

Can Graphic Design Save Your Life? is curated by graphic designer Lucienne Roberts and design educator Rebecca Wright, founders of publishing house GraphicDesign&, with Shamita Sharmacharja at Wellcome Collection.

  • Wellcome Collection
  • 183 Euston Road
  • London NW1 2BE
  • UK
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  • More details
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  • Image:
    Smoking is Slow Motion Suicide poster, 1972, Biman Mullick, Cleanair

 

Designs On Britain

Image of poster

Until 15 April 2018

Discover how much of the most iconic British design was produced by immigrants to this country.

20th century design in the UK was profoundly shaped by the arrival of pioneering Jewish émigré designers from continental Europe. They brought with them a knowledge of modernism and radically transformed the practice and language of British design.

Don’t miss iconic posters for London Underground, the General Post Office and the War Office created by designers including Dorrit Dekk, FHK Henrion and Hans Schleger.

  • Jewish Museum London
  • Raymond Burton House
  • 129-131 Albert Street
  • London NW1 7NB
  • UK
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  • More details
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  • Image:
    Falls Are Not Funny poster, designed by Stan Krol, 1967
    © The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents

 

Red Star Over Russia: A revolution in visual culture 1905–55

Until 18 February 2018

Image of poster

2017 marks the centenary of the October Revolution. Rebellion brought hope, chaos, heroism and tragedy as the Russian Empire became the Soviet Union, endured revolutions, civil war, famine, dictatorship and Nazi invasion. A new visual culture arose and transformed the fabric of everyday life.

The core of this exhibition comes from the extraordinary collection of photographer and graphic designer David King (1943–2016). He started his collection of over 250,000 items relating to this period while working for The Sunday Times Magazine in the 1970s. The collection was acquired by Tate in 2016.

This show is an opportunity to see the rare propaganda posters, prints and photographs collected by King – some bearing traces of state censorship. Including work by El Lissitzky, Gustav Klutsis, Dmitri Moor, Aleksandr Deineka, Nina Vatolina and Yevgeny Khaldei, it is a thrilling journey through a momentous period in world history.

  • Tate Modern
  • Bankside
  • London SE1 9TG
  • UK
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  • More details
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  • Image:
    Adolf Strakhov, Emancipated Woman – Build Socialism!, 1926, Lithograph on paper,
    The David King Collection, Tate

 

Image of Cholera notice

The A–Z of ephemera

Until 8 December 2017

The exhibition highlights the two different approaches that have led collectors and scholars to become involved with the fascinating world of ephemera: what they tell us about some aspect of life, and the characteristics of the artefact itself.

Some ephemerists are excited by the particular issues raised by a document through its content or the nature of its language and images; others are attracted by the physical object, its materials, design, and production. Needless to say, the two interests frequently overlap, and it would be an unusual ephemerist who does not take account of both aspects of any particular piece of ephemera.

But whatever an individual’s interests may be, the exhibition points to the need for curators and cataloguers of collections of ephemera to cater for both approaches. With this in mind two items (or panels of small items) have been chosen to represent each letter of the alphabet. One draws attention to a subject matter or theme (e.g. A = Aviation), the other to a category of ephemera (e.g. A = ABCs).

Items have been chosen from two sources: the representative collection of ephemera assembled over a long period by Maurice Rickards, which will not now be added to, and also, in more or less equal numbers, from a parallel collection that the Centre has been building up steadily since its foundation. The items chosen from these two collections reflect very broadly the period they cover (some 250 years) as well as the languages and countries represented.

Image of dance cardThe approach adopted for the exhibition throws up some bizarre conjunctions and also demonstrates the extraordinary variety of ephemera.

Thus, under D, we see a cholera notice issued in London in 1866, representing the subject matter ‘Disease’, alongside a panel of decorative ‘Dance cards’ of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as an example of a particular category of artefact. And under O we include administrative documents from ‘Oxford University’ in 1924 for their subject matter beside ‘Orange wrappers’ as a particular category of ephemera.

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  • Department of Typography & Graphic Communication
  • University of Reading
  • 2 Earley Gate
  • Whiteknights
  • Reading RG6 6AU
  • View on-line A–Z of ephemera exhibition
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  • Images:
    D for Disease: Cholera notice, 1866. 440 x 284 mm. [University of Reading: Centre for Ephemera Studies]
    D for Dance cards: a programme for a dance held at Caxton Hall by the Domestic Servants Benevolent Institution, 1907. 115 x 64 mm.

 

National Theatre Posters

Until 31 March 2018

Exhibition posterCurated by Rick Poynor, Professor of Design and Visual Culture at the University of Reading, this exhibition explores the evolution of poster design at the National Theatre, showcasing many classic examples.

From 1963 to the present day, each art director led the theatre’s graphic design studio in creating images for posters, programmes and now digital artwork. The exhibition features posters designed by Ken Briggs, Richard Bird, Michael Mayhew, Charlotte Wilkinson and current Creative Director Ollie Winser and the Graphic Design team.

The exhibition will include original posters, interviews with past and current Art or Creative Directors and will trace the changes in process, design and function over the past 50 years.

  • National Theatre
  • Upper Ground
  • South Bank
    London SE1 9PX
  • UK
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  • More details
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Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920

6 December 2017 - 3 February 2018

Cover of Christmas book

The Grolier Club of New York hosts this exhibition based upon the collections of the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), the display explores the variety of juvenile imprints created by the McLoughlin Brothers, an under-studied but very influential children’s literature publishing concern.

Founded by John McLoughlin Jr. and Edmund McLoughlin, the firm was one of the first to concentrate exclusively on works for children, producing illustrated books as well as printed paper dolls, toy soldiers, games, and valentines.

They created 1,000 titles in about 150 series between 1860 and 1890. McLoughlin Brothers reached both low- and middle-class customers by diversifying its stock and offering various price points for its products, ranging from one penny to a dollar per book.

Through strategic partnerships and collaborations the brothers expanded their distribution nationwide. They also repurposed their imprints to cross-promote and sell other items such as clothing and food and worked with D. Appleton and Company to create Spanish-language imprints that were sold throughout Latin America.

Radiant with Color & Art portrays the accomplishments and technological innovations of the McLoughlin Brothers publishing firm as well as exploring the early history of American juvenile literature publishing; early children’s publishing in New York City; depictions of humour, race, and social mores; and the many ways the firm portrayed Cinderella and Christmas over time, among other subjects.

  • Ground Floor Gallery
  • Grolier Club
  • 47 East 60th Street
  • New York, NY 10022
  • USA
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  • More details
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Life on the London Stage

Until 6 December 2017

Print of grimaldi

The curtain has lifted on this new exhibition from the London Metropolitan Archives which uncovers the lives of performers on the London stage, from the days of Elizabethan theatre to the 20th century.

Original records that document the successes of some of London’s most celebrated performers will appear alongside workhouse records, court registers and other sources. From Shakespeare’s forgotten brother to Charlie Chaplin and the stars of Music Hall, Life on the London Stage will delve into our and present a fascinating record of the lives of London’s entertainers.

Graham Packham, chairman of the City of London Corporation’s Culture, Heritage and Libraries Committee, said: "Some surprising finds and extraordinary stories have come to light during the LMA’s research for Life On The London Stage, including how Edmund Shakespeare, of whom many of us know nothing, followed his older brother to London to work as an actor. Visitors will also learn about the houses owned by Nell Gwyn, one of London’s greatest rags-to-riches stories; how music hall star, Marie Lloyd, alarmed the authorities with her routines; and Kenneth Williams’ advice about how he dealt with school bullies."

  • London Metropolitan Archives
  • 40 Northampton Road
  • Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB
  • UK
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  • More details
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  • Image: Detail from ticket for Mr Grimaldi's Night, Sadlers Wells, 1814

 

World War Ireland

Until 2018

In summer 1914 a war broke out in Europe that would change the world forever. In Ireland, many supported the cause and joined up or travelled to serve in nursing and auxiliary services. Others objected to the war on moral, social or political grounds. By the time the conflict ended in 1918, its impact had been felt through the length and breadth of the country.

Image of recruitment poster

World War Ireland is a free exhibition at the National Library of Ireland(NLI) that focuses on the unique aspects of the Irish WWI experience and draws on the NLI's collections of letters, diaries, recruiting posters, newspaper reports, cartoons, handbills and leaflets dating from 1914-1918. With original artefacts, first hand personal accounts and eyewitness testimony, World War Ireland brings visitors dramatically inside the lives of those who experienced WWI.

 

Street Fans: A Unique Liaison between Street Art & Fan Making

Until 31 December 2017

An international cast of street artists including RUN, C215, Nathan Bowen, Dale Grimshaw, Zabou & Sr.X are teaming up with fan maker extraordinaire, Sylvain Le Guen in a bid to reinvigorate the craft of fan making, cited by the Heritage Craft Association as at ‘serious risk of no longer being practiced.’ The fruits of the collaboration – fifty original folding fans – are set to enliven The Fan Museum’s elegant Georgian interiors from September 19.

Image of fan

At different times throughout the exhibition run visitors can get up close and personal with some of the street artists participating in the project, who’ll be occupying the galleries and making new works in response to the displays. The Museum’s expert fan making tutors will also be in residence encouraging visitors to try fan making for themselves. Check the Museum’s website for a schedule of events.

  • The Fan Museum
  • 12 Crooms Hill, Greenwich
  • London SE10 8ER
  • UK
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  • More details
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L'Affichomania: The Passion for French Posters

Until 7 January 2018

This exhibition features approximately 50 posters by the five grand masters of the medium: Jules Chéret, Eugène Grasset, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Alphonse Mucha.

Image: detail from poster

The posters date from 1875 to 1910, the exuberant era in France known as the Belle Époque. These pioneering artists reigned in Paris during this period of artistic proliferation, defining a never-before-seen, and never forgotten, art form.

Drawn from the Driehaus Collection of Fine and Decorative Arts, the posters on view feature such iconic images as Steinlen’s Le Chat Noir and Lautrec’s Moulin Rouge: La Goulue. Each of the five artists will be featured in one of the period galleries in the Museum, allowing guests to explore the artists’ individual style and compare them with their contemporaries.

  • The Richard H. Driehaus Museum
  • 40 East Erie Street
  • Chicago, Illinois 60611
  • USA
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Poster Girls: A century of art and design

Until January 2019

Image of poster

Poster Girls will highlight some of the key female artists who have designed for London Transport and Transport for London including Dora Batty, Herry Perry, Laura Knight, Anna Zinkeisen, Margaret Calkin James and Freda Lingstrom.

The artists and featured work will be examined and contextualised by both the era in which they lived and worked and their style, looking at influences both from within the design community and from the wider world.

As well as stunning original posters from London Transport Museum’s collection, Poster Girls will include accompanying material such as letters, ceramics, photographs and original artworks.

  • London Transport Museum
  • Covent Garden Piazza
  • London WC2E 7BB
  • UK
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  • More details
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Victoria Revealed

Until 17 February 2018

Image of Queen Victoria and children

This exhibition explores the many, often surprising, aspects of Queen Victoria’s character: devoted wife, dedicated mother, devastated widow and powerful stateswoman.

Follow Victoria’s story from the room in which she spent her first moments as queen. Trace her journey from young girl to queen enthralled with a new husband, to grieving matriarch and ruler of a vast empire.

Included in the exhibition are iconic, impressive, beautiful and often deeply personal objects, from Victoria’s simple white silk wedding gown, to the dolls she made, dressed and named as a little girl.

Victoria and the people who surrounded her tell this story: excerpts from her journals, letters and reports from contemporary commentators give insight into the extraordinary life of the woman whose name defined an age.

 

 

Ephemera - minor transient documents of every day life